Most Expensive: Super Bowl XLIX

Every year, it seems like America’s consistently most televised event keeps becoming more and more expensive. 2014 proved to be the most expensive Super Bowl to date, and with the way the numbers look right now, 2018 won’t be far behind if it doesn’t surpass. The Squander takes a look at the most expensive moments of Super Bowl XLIX.

Most Expensive: Super Bowl XLIX

1. The Actual Tickets

Excluding all of the additional prices that come with travelling to the Super Bowl location if not lucky enough to be close, tickets to America’s biggest yearly sports game do not run cheap. Despite ticket prices being slightly lower this year than last, the most expensive ticket will cost one dedicated fan $11,500. According to the Puget Sound Business Journal, this is the most expensive ticket sold through conference night since 2011 and is in the club level at the 50-yard line. However, a regular ticket will only costs fans a comparably cheap average price of $4,385 with a get-in price of $1,800. The average price is the most expensive since XLVI, according to Forbes. each. Of course, that’s more expensive than a spring break trip to Mexico, but believe or not ticket prices are actually down this year and expected to keep dropping in price as the big game nears.

2. The Advertisements

Being the most televised event, the Super Bowl naturally compels big companies to spend major dollars on game-day advertisements. This works out well for us viewers, because its literally the one time where we can actually enjoy commercial breaks. Companies like Budweiser routinely make Super Bowl commercial breaks entertaining by upping the ante for funniest commercial year after year, but making this kind of impression is costly. This year, NBC is demanding $4,500,000 for 30-second advertisements slots. That number is up from last year, but nevertheless Business Insider claims 95% of the slots have sold out.

3. The Pre-Game Parties

Going to a lavish party will cost you less, typically, than attending the actual game. The most expensive Super Bowl party in Arizona right now is being hosted by Rolling Stones Magazine (see, Jan Wenner). Taking place on January 31st, tickets to the party are averaging $1,395 to see big acts like Steven Tyler and Charli XCX. A much more reasonably priced deal is the $427 ticket price for a three-day party being held by University of Phoenix by DirectTV which includes a more impressive line-up of performers like Snoop Dogg, Imagine Dragons, and Calvin Harris.

4. The Performer

Earlier this year, rumor had it that the coveted spot for half-time performer would be between Coldplay, Rihanna and Katy Perry. As we know now, Katy Perry will be our lovely half-time performer this Super Bowl. However we’re fairly certain that she’s probably not seeing much of a paycheck from this gig, at least not directly from the NFL itself. A heavily circulated rumor claimed that Perry not only was not getting paid to perform, she actually had to “pay to play” for such a televised honor by giving the NFL some of her post-show profits. Perry did not dispute that this was asked of her, but insisted she refused to do so. We have a feeling, then, that whatever she was paid was not much at all.

5. The Snacks

Wing prices down, guacamole and pizza prices up. That’s pretty much all you need to know about Super Bowl snackage, according to the New York Post. This is great news for chicken wing lovers, since the memory of last year’s dreaded chicken wing shortage is still fresh.

6. The Bets/ Prop Bets

Stay tuned for an update of the most expensive game day bets. We’re secretly hoping Floyd Mayweather makes history with some insane high-stakes move this year.